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Women Who Made a Difference - Who Was? Pack of 20

Women Who Made a Difference - Who Was? Pack of 20
    Code: WHOWA2003
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    Format: Paperback
    Publisher: Penguin Workshop
    Series: Who Was?
    Ages: 8 to 12
    Size: 5¼ X 7½
    For Grades: 2 to 6
    List Price: $119.80
    Regular L.E.S. Price: $71.88
    Sale Price: $59.90
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    Savings: $59.90 (50%)
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    This series is a favorite because it combines easy-to-understand history and biography lessons with engaging stories and fun illustrations. Discover more about American women from history!


    Inside- Who Was Susan B. Anthony?

    Titles include:


    Who Was Abigail Adams?

    Abigail Adams was a strong woman far ahead of her time. She urged her husband, President John Adams, to “remember the ladies” and despite having no formal education herself, she later advocated for equal education in public schools for both boys and girls. She was also the first First Lady to live in the White House! This biography tells the story of Abigail Adams and her role in America’s Revolutionary War period.


    Who Was Anne Frank?

    In her amazing diary, Anne Frank revealed the challenges and dreams common for any young girl. But Hitler brought her childhood to an end and forced her and her family into hiding. Who Was Anne Frank? looks closely at Anne's life before the secret annex, what life was like in hiding, and the legacy of her diary. Black-and-white illustrations including maps and diagrams provide historical and visual reference in an easy-to-read biography written in a way that is appropriate and accessible for younger readers.


    Who Was Betsy Ross?

    Born the eighth of seventeen children in Philadelphia, Betsy Ross lived in a time when the American colonies were yearning for independence from British rule.


    Who Is Dolly Parton?

    Born in a little cabin in Tennessee, Dolly Parton always dreamed big, and she was right to! She wrote her first song at age five and became a country music star by the time she was in her early twenties. Of course, her success didn’t stop there. Dolly Parton is also an actress, author, businesswoman, and philanthropist whose “Imagination Library” reading initiative reaches children throughout the US, Canada, and the UK. There is simply no one like Dolly Parton!


    Who Was Harriet Beecher Stowe?

    Born in Connecticut in 1811, Harriet Beecher Stowe was an abolitionist, author, and playwright. Slavery was a major industry in the American South, and Stowe worked with the Underground Railroad to help escaped slaves head north towards freedom.

    NOTE: This title has been substituted for "Ida B. Wells" which has temporarily sold out.


    Who Was Jacqueline Kennedy?

    Private and bookish, Jackie Kennedy found herself thrust into the world spotlight as the young and glamorous wife of the President John F. Kennedy. As First Lady she restored the once neglected rooms of the White House to their former glory, and through her charm and elegance became a style icon whose influence is still felt even today. Kids will be fascinated to read about a First Family whose youth, intelligence, and good looks captivated America in the early 1960s.


    Who Was Joan of Arc?

    Joan of Arc was born in a small French village during the worst period of the Hundred Years’ War. For generations, France had been besieged by the British. At age 11, Joan began to see religious visions telling her to join forces with the King of France. By the time she was a teenager, she was leading troops into battle in the name of her country. Though she was captured and executed for her beliefs, Joan of Arc became a Catholic saint and has since captured the world’s imagination.


    Who Was Laura Ingalls Wilder?

    Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books, based on her own childhood and later life, are still beloved classics almost a century after she began writing them. Now young readers will see just how similar Laura’s true-life story was to her books. Born in 1867 in the “Big Woods” in Wisconsin, Laura experienced both the hardship and the adventure of living on the frontier. Her life and times are captured in engaging text and 80 black-and-white illustrations.


    Who Is Malala Yousafzai?

    Malala Yousafzai was a girl who loved to learn but was told that girls would no longer be allowed to go to school. She wrote a blog that called attention to what was happening in her beautiful corner of Pakistan and realized that words can bring about change. She has continued to speak out for the right of all children to have an education. In 2014 she won the Nobel Peace Prize.


    Who Was Marie Curie?

    Born in Warsaw, Poland, on November 7, 1867, Marie Curie was forbidden to attend the male-only University of Warsaw, so she enrolled at the Sorbonne in Paris to study physics and mathematics. There she met a professor named Pierre Curie, and the two soon married, forming one of the most famous scientific partnerships in history. Together they discovered two elements and won a Nobel Prize in 1903. (Later Marie won another Nobel award for chemistry in 1911.) She died in Savoy, France, on July 4, 1934, a victim of many years of exposure to toxic radiation.


    Who Was Mother Teresa?

    Born a humble girl in what is now Albania, Agnes Bojaxhiu lived a charitable life. She pledged herself to a religious order at the age of 18 and chose the name Sister Teresa, after the patron saint of missionaries. While teaching in India, where famine and violence had devastated the poor, Teresa shed her habit and walked the streets of Calcutta tending to the needs of the destitute. Her charity work soon expanded internationally, and her name remains synonymous with compassion and devotion to the poor.


    Who Was Nellie Bly?

    Known for her extraordinary and record-breaking trip around the world and her undercover investigation of a mental institution, Nellie Bly was one of the first female investigative reporters in the United States and a pioneer in the field of journalism.


    Who Was Princess Diana?

    A shy twenty-year-old girl stepped out of a horse-drawn coach and into the world spotlight, capturing the imagination of millions as a real life fairy-tale princess. Although the storybook marriage didn't have a happy ending, Diana learned to use her fame as a way to champion charitable causes near to her heart. She became the People's Princess by humanizing the image of the royal family and showing care and concern for all people, including the homeless, the sick, and others in need.


    Who Was Queen Victoria?

    Her reign of 63 years and seven months is known as the Victorian Era, a period of industrial, cultural, scientific, and political change that was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire. But Victoria was raised under close supervision and near isolation until she became Queen of the United Kingdom at the young age of 18. She married her first cousin, Albert, and had nine children who married into families across Europe. By the time she had earned the nickname “The Grandmother of Europe” and the title “Empress of India” it was indeed true that the sun never set on the British Empire. Publicly, she became a national icon, but privately, Who Was Queen Victoria?


    Who Was Rachel Carson?

    Though she grew up in rural Pennsylvania, Rachel Carson dreamed of the sea. In 1936 she began work with the Bureau of Fisheries and soon after published Under the Sea Wind, her first of many nature books. Her 1962 bestseller, Silent Spring, sent shockwaves through the country and warned of the dangers of DDT and other pesticides. A pioneering environmentalist, Rachel Carson helped awaken the global consciousness for conservation and preservation.


    Who Was Rosa Parks?

    In 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama. This seemingly small act triggered civil rights protests across America and earned Rosa Parks the title, Mother of the Civil Rights Movement.

    NOTE: This title has been substituted for "Ruth Bader Ginsburg" which has temporarily sold out.


    Who Was Sacagawea?

    Sacagawea was only sixteen when she made one of the most remarkable journeys in American history, traveling 4500 miles by foot, canoe, and horse-all while carrying a baby on her back! Without her, the Lewis and Clark expedition might have failed. Through this engaging book, kids will understand the reasons that today, 200 years later, she is still remembered and immortalized on a golden dollar coin.


    Who Was Clara Barton?

    Clarissa “Clara” Barton was a shy girl who grew up to become a teacher, nurse, and humanitarian. At a time when few women worked outside the home, she became the first woman to hold a government job, as a patent clerk in Washington, DC. In 1864, she was appointed “lady in charge” of the hospitals at the front lines of the Union Army, where she became known as the “Angel of the Battlefield.” Clara Barton built a career helping others. She went on to found the American Red Cross, one of her greatest accomplishments, and one of the most recognized organizations in the world.

    NOTE: This title has been substituted for "Sojourner Truth" which has temporarily sold out.


    Who Was Susan B. Anthony?

    Susan B. Anthony may be an international icon but her campaign for women's rights had personal roots. Working as a school teacher in New York, Anthony refused to settle for less pay than her male colleagues which ignited her lifelong devotion to women's equality. Anthony toured the United States and Europe giving speeches and publishing articles as one of the most important advocates of women's rights.


    Who Is Temple Grandin?

    Temple Grandin wasn’t officially diagnosed with autism until she was in her 40s, but she knew at an early age that she was different from her family and classmates. She couldn’t show affection, she acted out when noises or other stimuli overwhelmed her, and she only felt comfortable when spending time with the animals on her aunt’s ranch. But instead of seeing her differences as limitations, Temple used them to guide her education and career in animal science. She has become a leading advocate for the autistic as well as for the humane treatment of animals at meat packing companies. This inspiring biography by Patricia Brennan Demuth shines a light on Temple Grandin’s intellect, creativity, and unique spirit.