Famous Early Americans - Who Was? Set of 10

Famous Early Americans - Who Was? Set of 10
    Code: WHOWA206
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    Format: Paperback
    Accelerated Reader Books
    Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap
    Series: Who Was?
    Ages: 8 to 12
    Size: 5¼ X 7½
    List Price: $59.90
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    This series is a favorite because it combines easy-to-understand history and biography lessons with engaging stories and fun illustrations. Learn more about these early American men and women.


    Inside- Who Was Johnny Appleseed?

    Titles include:


    Alexander Hamilton

    Who Was Alexander Hamilton?

    Born in the British West Indies and orphaned as a child, Alexander Hamilton made his way to the American Colonies and studied to become a lawyer. He joined a local militia during the American Revolution, rose to the rank of Major General, and became the chief aide to General George Washington.

    After the war, he became the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. He founded the Bank of New York and The New York Post newspaper. He served as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention and is also celebrated as a coauthor of The Federalist Papers, a series of essays that are still used today to interpret the U.S. Constitution.

    The end of his life became a national scandal when he was shot and killed in a duel with then-Vice President Aaron Burr.

     


    Who Was Ben Franklin?

    Ben Franklin was the scientist who, with the help of a kite, discovered that lightning is electricity. He was also a statesman, an inventor, a printer, and an author-a man of such amazingly varied talents that some people claimed he had magical powers! Full of all the details kids will want to know, the true story of Benjamin Franklin is by turns sad and funny, but always honest and awe-inspiring.


    Who Was Booker T. Washington?

    African American educator, author, speaker, and advisor to presidents of the United States, Booker Taliaferro Washington was the leading voice of former slaves and their descendants during the late 1800s. As part of the last generation of leaders born into slavery, Booker believed that blacks could better progress in society through education and entrepreneurship, rather than trying to directly challenge the Jim Crow segregation.

    After hearing the Emancipation Proclamation and realizing he was free, young Booker decided to make learning his life. He taught himself to read and write, pursued a formal education, and went on to found the Tuskegee Institute—a black school in Alabama—with the goal of building the community's economic strength and pride. The institute still exists and is home to famous alumnae like scientist George Washington Carver.

     


    Who Was Daniel Boone?

    Called the “Great Pathfinder”, Daniel Boone is most famous for opening up the West to settlers through Kentucky. A symbol of America’s pioneering spirit Boone was a skilled outdoorsman and an avid reader although he never attended school. Sydelle Kramer skillfully recounts Boone’s many adventures such as the day he rescued his own daughter from kidnappers.


    Who Was Davy Crockett?

    Davy Crockett, the King of the Wild Frontier, is a man of legend. He is said to have killed his first bear when he was three years old. His smile alone killed another, and he skinned a bear by forcing him to run between two trees. Fact or fiction? Find out the real story of this folk hero, who did love to hunt bears, served as a congressman for Tennessee, and fought and died at the Alamo.


    Who Was Johnny Appleseed?

    The perfect biography to “bite into” at the start of a new school year! Children are sure to be fascinated by the eccentric and legendary Johnny Appleseed, a man who is best known for bringing apple trees to the Midwest. Over John Chapman’s lifetime, he saw the country grow and start to spread westward. Traveling alone— in bare feet and sporting a pot on his head!—Johnny left his own special mark planting orchards that helped nourish new communities.


    Who Was Paul Revere?

    In 1775, Paul Revere of Boston made his now-famous horseback ride warning colonists of an impending attack by the British. This event went largely unnoticed in history until Longfellow celebrated it in a poem in 1861. So who was Paul Revere? In addition to being an American patriot, he was a skilled silversmith and made false teeth from hippo tusks!


    Who Was Robert E. Lee?

    Robert E. Lee seemed destined for greatness. His father was a Revolutionary War hero and at West Point he graduated second in his class! In 1861, when the Southern states seceded from the Union, Lee was offered the opportunity to command the Union forces. However, even though he was against the war, his loyalty to his home state of Virginia wouldn't let him fight for the North. Despite the South's ultimate defeat, General Robert E. Lee remains one of the United States' true military heroes.


    Sacagawea

    Who Was Sacagawea?

    Sacagawea was only sixteen when she made one of the most remarkable journeys in American history, traveling 4500 miles by foot, canoe, and horse-all while carrying a baby on her back! Without her, the Lewis and Clark expedition might have failed. Through this engaging book, kids will understand the reasons that today, 200 years later, she is still remembered and immortalized on a golden dollar coin.


    Who Was Sitting Bull?

    No one knew the boy they called “Jumping Badger” would grow to become a great leader. Born on the banks of the Yellowstone River, Sitting Bull, as he was later called, was tribal chief and holy man of the Lakota Sioux tribe in a time of fierce conflict with the United States.